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History of Carluke

Records show that the earliest inhabitants in Carluke, also known as Kirkstyle, were monks. A Roman road passed this way and a number of tower houses were built in the area.

It was chartered as a Royal Burgh in 1662 and by 1695 parish records report six families living in the area. In 1746 Bonnie Prince Charlie's army stopped off in Carluke during their retreat from Derby to feed and rest their horses.

By the 1800s the population had risen to 380 and the main industries were weaving and farming. The town exploded onto the map several years later with the building of the Glasgow to Carlisle trunk road and a train station.

Over the next two centuries Carluke became a prosperous town thanks to corn milling, cotton weaving, coal mining and the manufacture of bricks, glass, confectionery and jam.

During the Great War, two men from Carluke, Lance-Corporal William Angus and Sergeant Thomas Caldwell were awarded the Victoria Cross, as was Lieutenant Donald Cameron in World War II.

Surveyor and cartographer, Major General William Roy was born at Miltonhead in 1726. Following the Jacobite Rebellion led by Bonnie Prince Charlie, Roy was directed to produce a map of Scotland. It took him eight years and the hand-drawn result is exhibited in the British Library, London. Roy was later commissioned to set up the network on which all subsequent surveying is based. He wanted to set up a UK organisation for surveying and mapping but Ordnance Survey wasn't created until a year after his death. Roy also studied Roman remains and his book Military Antiquities of the Romans in Scotland was published three years after his death.

Peter Kid, originally from Fife, became one of Carluke's Covenanting ministers in 1672. He twice refused to observe Charles II as head of the Church and was imprisoned on the Bass Rock in 1685. He was released the next year due to failing health and old age and moved back to Carluke. He is buried in Carluke Parish churchyard.

The sculptor Robert Forrest was born in Carluke in 1790. He began as a stone mason and his work includes a statue of William Wallace in Lanark and the statue of Henry Dundas, the Viscount Melville, which tops the Melville Monument in St Andrew's Square, Edinburgh.

Doctor Daniel Reid Rankin, who was born in 1805, dedicated much of his life to helping the people of Carluke and was a doctor in the town for more than 50 years. He wrote and published a history of Carluke in 1875 and was a noted geologist and palaeontologist (some of the fossils he collected are now housed in the Royal Scottish Museum in Edinburgh). Rankin died in 1882 and was buried in the old churchyard.

Milton Lockhart, two miles west of Carluke, was the home of John Lockhart, born in 1794. He was the biographer of Sir Walter Scott and in 1987 the remains of Milton Lockhart House were transported to Japan and re-erected at Takayama-mura in the Gunma-Ken region of Japan. The new owners renamed the castle Lockheart Castle.

The images of Milton Lockhart House (Lockheart Castle) below were very kindly given to us by Thornokami from Japan.

 

Lockhart Castle

Lockhart Castle

Lockhart Castle

Lockhart Castle

Lockhart Castle

Lockhart Castle

Lockhart Castle